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Iraq forces in west Mosul aim for key bridgeIraqi forces battled jihadists in west Mosul on Sunday, aiming to build a floating bridge across the Tigris to establish an important supply route linked to the recaptured east bank. A week into a major push on the western side of the city, where an estimated 2,000 holdout jihadists and 750,000 civilians are trapped, government forces made steady progress. "We had an important operation this morning to move towards the bridge," Colonel Falah al-Wabdan of the interior ministry's Rapid Response units that have spearheaded the breach into west Mosul told AFP in the Jawsaq neighbourhood.

Photos of the day - February 26, 2017Somali migrants cross the U.S. border into Canada; figure skating Gold medalist Choi Da-bin of South Korea, performs during the closing ceremony of the Asian Winter Games; Portland Timbers midfielder David Guzman and Los Angeles Galaxy forward Giovani dos Santos vie for the ball. See more news-related photo galleries and follow us on Yahoo News Photo Tumblr.

Nokia 3310 hands-on: not the retro featurephone you’re looking forOn Sunday afternoon, Nokia's new Finnish overlord, HMD Global, confirmed what many rumors said before the kickstart of this year’s Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain. The iconic Nokia 3310 is being revived this year, under HMD Global’s version of Nokia. Unfortunately, it looks less like Nokia's big comeback, and more like a phone that just plain sucks. Yes, it’s true, there’s a new Nokia 3310 in town, one that’s so special to HMD Global that it was unveiled only at the end of an otherwise great press conference that showed us a brand new, bold version of Nokia. Nokia’s “one more thing” moment on Sunday was, for better or worse, a great albeit unoriginal marketing trick. What better way to fire up the dormant Nokia fans out there than by reviving an iconic phone that became the go-to device for instant communications for millions of people around the world? img_8980 The first phone that I ever used, at the insistence of my parents, was a Nokia 3310. I’ve probably used it for a couple of years before passing it along to my family. The device exists to this day, and it probably still works. But would I buy or use the new Nokia 3310? I can’t see that happening in a million years. The new handset has a cleaner design, a bigger display, more colors (Dark Blue, Grey, Warm Red, Yellow), better battery life (22-hour talk-time and one-month standby), and what feels like a smaller footprint. At the same time, it feels light and cheap (it’ll actually cost €49 when it launches globally later this year), the kind of phone you’d buy only if you absolutely had to have a cellular phone at hand. Don’t get me wrong, the new Nokia 3310 is probably the kind of phones that millions of people will touch for the first time, well before buying a smartphone. But the minute I tried to press the screen to make a certain thing happen — in this case, I was looking to activate a good old game of Snake — I realized that for me and everyone like them, there’s no going back. img_8971 The smartphone is the way forward. Sure, the screen might disappear in the future, just as voice assistants and other types of reality (think virtual and alternative) get more advanced. And the smartphone of the future might get as small as the Nokia 3310. But for the time being, the Nokia 3310 is really not the phone you should consider buying as your primary talk/text device. No matter how old you are, and no matter how much you may appreciate Nokia and its creations, do yourself a favor and buy anything else for the emerging company. It’s got three amazing “pure” Android handsets waiting for you to discover them, including the Nokia 3, Nokia 5, and Nokia 6, that will offer you the modern app-filled phone experience that actually makes your life better. The Nokia 3310 (2017 edition) is just the marketing trick that will get you to discover the exciting new Nokia. And, as you can see, it works. I've just told you the Nokia 3, Nokia 5, and Nokia 6 are phones you shouldn't miss out on this year if budget is a huge factor.

Syrian warplanes pound rebel-held area in central cityBEIRUT (AP) — Government warplanes pounded a rebel-held neighborhood in the central city of Homs on Sunday, killing at least three and wounding dozens, Syrian opposition activists said, and President Bashar Assad's forces pushed ahead in Syria's offensive on the historic town of Palmyra held by the Islamic State group.

Here’s the three new Nokia Android phones you’ve been waiting forAbout five years too late, Nokia has finally entered the Android market. It's probably not quite what you were expecting: the phones really come from Nokia's new Finnish owner, HMD Global. But hey, they're Nokia phones running Android, and they look half-decent, so who are we to complain? Things get better when you hear about the design decisions HMD has been making. Just a few small companies (and Motorola) have done in the past, HMD is shipping all three phones with pure Android, no gimmicks, no bundled apps, and no bungled re-skinning. The three devices are called the Nokia 3, Nokia 5 and Nokia 6. The specs and price increase along with the number, but all three handsets look distinctly mid-range. It starts with the Nokia 3, the most basic of the new devices. It's featuring a 5-inch display up front, generic quad-core processor and 2GB of RAM underneath, and 16GB of storage, expandable with a microSD. nok3 The design looks a lot like the Nokia we've recently become familiar with: curved edges, a polycarbonate frame, and most of the flair coming from color. It's not a bad design, normally, but in a world of aluminum unibody, it's sorely in danger of feeling cheap. That's exactly what the Nokia 3 is, though, as it should be available in the spring for around $150. Just like the new 3310, there's a range of colors for you to choose from. nokia The Nokia 5 looks like a small step up in price, but hits a much more attractive place with the specs. Ther's a 5.2-inch display, 2GB of RAM, 16GB of storage, and a Wualcomm Snapdragon 430 underneath. That's a decent amount of power for a mid-range Android device, and especially given that it's running a naked version of Android with no bloat, should be enough for most day-to-day use. The polycarbonate body is also upgraded to aluminum, which helps with a more premium feel. It still looks to have a lot of bezel compared to this year's crop of smartphones, but at the price of the 5, you can lett that go. It should be shipping in Q2 for $200, which is a steal for a serious low-end handset these days. There's also one other piece of classic Nokia to be found in the 5's hardware: a 13-megapixel camera at the back and 6-megapixel front-facing camera. Provided that these are good lenses and not just gratuitously thrown on there to save the spec sheet, that could mean that Nokia's legendary mobile cameras are back for good. nok6 Finally, we've got the Nokia 6. It many ways, it's similar to the 5: aluminum body, Snapdragon 430 processor, but the screen has been upgraded to 5.5-inches and the RAM to 3GB. The camera also gets a small bump to 16 megapixels. There's also a limited edition available with 4GB of RAM and 64GB of internal storage, if that really catches your eye. It's still not priced anywhere close to flagship smartphone pricing, with the regular version running about $250. None of these phones are going to change the world or compete with a new iPhone, but it looks to be a solid first step back into the phone-making business for Nokia. We'll have to wait and see how sales actually go -- for low-end phones like these, it will probably depend if they can get into any carrier retail stores -- but the future looks a little brighter for Nokia after today.

US urges Russia to 'immediately' observe Ukraine ceasefireThe United States called on Russia Sunday to "immediately" observe the ceasefire in Ukraine, accusing combined Russian and separatist forces of targeting international monitors. "We call on Russia and the separatist forces it backs to immediately observe the ceasefire, withdraw all heavy weapons, and allow full and unfettered access to the OSCE monitors," the State Department said. State Department spokesman Mark Toner said the United States was closely monitoring growing violence in eastern Ukraine and the failure of the combined Russian and separatist forces to abide by a ceasefire agreed to two years ago in Minsk.

In Puerto Rico, pensions' decline pits retirees against lendersThe U.S. territory is doing all it can to present itself as a reliable place to invest, but resolving the pensions issue will require a careful balance. Benefit structures are widely seen as unsustainable, but draconian cuts to pensioners could deepen the population's reliance on government subsidies and compound rampant emigration. "Many of our retirees are already under the poverty line," Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rossello told Reuters in an interview this past week, saying any pension cuts would attempt to protect the poorest beneficiaries.

Man charged in crash at New Orleans Mardi Gras paradeNew Orleans police booked Neilson Rizzuto after taking him into custody in "a highly intoxicated state" immediately after the accident on Saturday evening, the department said. Rizzuto was charged with two charges of vehicular negligence injuring in the first degree, hit and run driving and the reckless operation of a motor vehicle, according to a statement. No further information about Rizzuto was immediately available.

What we've learned about President Trump during first weeks in officeABC News' George Stephanopoulos reports the latest in politics on "This Week."

This Week Fast Forward 02.26.2017Speed through the highlights from the latest "This Week."

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